Archives for posts with tag: art

Your friendly Chiropractor in Chandler AZ, Dr. Dan Rae, is back at the computer during the lunch hour try and crunch out the article on Popliteus Tendinitis.  You are probably thinking to yourself, “What is this guy talking about.  I have never heard of Popliteus Tendinitis.”  Well, it is a lot more common than you think.

Popliteus Tendinitis

 

The popliteus muscles acts an an internal rotator (rotates the knee inward) when the knee is non-weight bearing.  Furthermore, it plays a very important role in supporting the Posterior Cruciate Ligament (PCL) and the Lateral Collateral Ligament (LCL), preventing the femur from sliding forward over the tibia as well as preventing varus angulation (inward angulation of the distal segment of a bone or joint).  The popliteus muscles also pulls the posterior lateral meniscus backwards during knee flexion.

These patients generally come into my clinic complaining of symptoms almost identical to Iliotibial Band Syndrome, which is pain on the outer portion of the knee after running or walking downhill.  Many times this injury is confused with Iliotibial Band Syndrome, and the patient does not get better because he/she is being treated for the wrong injury.

Rest and ice is needed in the initial stage of the injury; however, they are quickly replaced by myofascial release techniques Active Release Technique (ART) and Graston Technique to prevent scar tissue formation and chronic shortening of the muscle.  Orthotics have also been shown to be beneficial in the prevention of this injury.

If you are struggling with Knee Pain, call my office today at (480) 366-4041.  We can Help!

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Your friendly Chiropractor in Chandler AZ, Dr. Dan Rae, is back at the computer today moving down the leg a little bit to talk about Iliotibial Band Syndrome also known as ITB Syndrome or ITBS.  This is something that I would have to say that I see every single day in my office, and therefore, it needs to be addressed.

Iliotibial Band Syndrome

In the image above by MendMeShop, we are clearly able to see the structures involved with Iliotibial Band Syndrome.  It is believed that the cause of this syndrome stems from a tight iliotibial band (ITB) that rubs against the lateral epicondyle of the femur when the knee is bent at approximately 30 to 40 degrees.  There are predisposing factors to this syndrome such as running downhill, hyperpronation (arches collapse and ankles roll in), or cycling without allowing the leg to become fully extended at the bottom of each rotation.

These patients come into my office complaining of pain on the outside of their (lateral) knee that has progressively increased with time.  The pain is almost related to running, but some individuals may develop it from sitting for long periods.  Downhill running seems to be the main cause and pain occurs just before the heel makes contact with the ground.  Some of my patients report a squeaking noise when bending and straightening the knee.

Treatment for Iliotibial Band Syndrome is not one of the most comfortable treatments.  In the acute phase rest and ice is necessary, but as soon as possible stretching and myofascial release techniques such as Active Release Technique (ART) and Graston Technique should be implemented to break up any fibrotic adhesions that may have developed between the ITB and the surrounding musculature.  Kinesiology Tape has also been shown to alleviate some on the tension being placed on the ITB.  In some cases orthotics are necessary to prevent hyperpronation.

If you are struggling with Knee Pain, call my office today at (480) 366-4041.  We can Help!

Your friendly Chiropractor in Chandler AZ, Dr. Dan Rae, is back at the computer this morning trying to pump out this article prior to patients arriving.  Today, I am going to continue with the thigh and address the Quadriceps Strain.  This injury is not seen as much in my office as the Hamstring Strain, but I do still see it quite frequently.

Quadriceps Strain

In the image above by MendMeShop, we are able to clearly see the muscles the form the quadriceps muscle group and more.  The cause of a Quadriceps Strain is due to sudden contraction of the quadriceps, which results in what we often here as a pull, or less commonly, a full rupture of the muscle.  Some reasons that would predispose someone to this injury is tight quadriceps, which generally stems from not properly warming up prior to activity as well as imbalance between the quadriceps of the opposite leg, or one leg being shorter than the other.

These patients generally come into my office complaining of a sudden pulling pain at the front of the thigh after attempting to sprint, whiffing on a kick, or stopping very rapidly.

Treatment for this condition is not very difficult, but must be done properly to avoid more serious problems.  Ice should be applied as soon as possible to control the inflammation and swelling coupled with neoprene or some sort of elastic support.  Kinesiology Tape can be applied to reduce the tension being placed on the quadriceps musculature.  Stretching should be initiated as soon as possible with very gentle stretching.  Myofascial release techniques such as Active Release Technique (ART) and Graston Technique can be implemented to prevent scar tissue formation and chronic shortening of the muscle.  Complete tears or ruptures of the muscle or tendon require surgical repair.

If you are struggling with Thigh Pain, Hip Pain, or Knee Pain, call my office today at (480) 366-4041.  We can Help!

Your friendly Chiropractor in Chandler AZ, Dr. Dan Rae, is back at the computer this afternoon to talk about the Adductor Strain also known as a Groin Pull or Pulled Groin.  This is an injury that happens quite often, and I would have to say I see it mostly in individuals who do not warm up properly.

adductor strain

The cause of the Adductor Strain is generally from a sudden contraction of the adductor muscles (the muscles that pull the leg back to mid line) from a stretched position where the hip abducted out away from the body or in a flexed position.  The most common site of this injury is at the junction of the muscle and the tendon of the adductor magnus muscle.

These patients usually come into my office complaining pain in the groin area after performing movements such as kicking, sprinting, water skiing, or jumping such as high jumps or hurdles.  They also say that the pain in the groin came on immediately after the movement and was incapacitating.

Treatment for this condition sometimes includes an elastic figure eight strapping around the hip with slight extension and internal rotation of the hip.  Kinesiology Tape is often applied to decrease the amount of tension being placed on the adductor muscles, and myofascial release techniques such as Active Release Technique (ART) and Graston Technique are utilized to prevent scar tissue formation and encourage proper healing.

If you are struggling with Hip Pain or Groin Pain, call my office today at (480) 366-4041.  We can Help!

Your friendly Chiropractor in Chandler AZ, Dr. Dan Rae, is back at the computer as we are starting to warm up outside to talk about Hamstring Strains as runners start to get back out on the roads and so forth.  This is a condition that I see a lot in the spring months as people begin to become more active to try and get those beach bodies

Hamstring Strain

In the image above by MendMeShop, we are able to to clearly see a Hamstring Strain of the biceps femoris muscle.  This condition call also occur in the semitendinosus and semimembranosus muscles.  The reason this injury occurs is from an overcontraction of the hamstring while it is in a position of being stretched.  Tearing occurs most often at the junction of the muscles and aponeurosis (A sheet of pearly-white fibrous tissue that takes the place of a tendon in sheetlike muscles having a wide area of attachment). An Avulsion Fracture (An avulsion fracture is a bone fracture, which occurs when a fragment of bone tears away from the main mass of bone as a result of physical trauma) is possible at the ischial tuberosity (sit bone) in younger athletes whose growth plates haven’t closed yet.

These patients are usually what we would call “weekend warriors” all the way to the serious athlete who feels a sudden pull or pop at the back of the thigh following some sort of forceful knee extension maneuver.

Treatment for this condition consists of rest, ice, use of crutches for several days, gentle stretching as soon as possible as well as soft-tissue treatments such as Active Release Technique (ART) and Graston Technique, and a long-term goal of restrengthening beginning when 75% of the normal range of motion is available.  Kinesiology Tape can be applied to decrease the amount of tension being placed on the hamstring.  Prevention of future injury should focus on preevent stretching, maintaining a proper strength ratio between the hamstrings and the quadriceps (0.6:1), and strength balance between the two hamstrings.

If you are struggling with Hip Pain, Leg Pain, or Knee Pain, call my office today at (480) 366-4041.  We can Help!

Your friendly Chiropractor in Chandler AZ, Dr. Dan Rae, is back at the computer this morning trying to fit this article in prior to seeing patients today.  In keeping with the hip theme I am going to review a condition called Snapping Hip Syndrome.  A question that I get asked several times each day is why is my hip popping or snapping.  Well, today you will find out one of the main reasons for this.

internal-snapping-hip-syndromeexternal-snapping-hip-syndrome

In the images above by MendMeShop, we are able to see the structures involved in Snapping Hip Syndrome as well as a little bit of how it happens.  Snapping at the hip is most often due to tendons that are tight and snap over a bony prominence or or a fluid-filled sack called bursa.  In some cases, moving the leg away from the body may cause a suction effect similar to joint gapping with manipulation, and even less frequently, a loose body may be found in the joint.  However, with loose bodies, there are also signs of mechanical movement blockage.

These patients are generally in my office for something else when they ask about there hip snapping because it does not generally cause them pain.  The location of the snapping is a good indication of the offending tendon.

Usually this is not a problem, and it is typically position dependent.  If painful or irritating strengthening exercises have proven to be more beneficial than stretching.  However, if the irritation persists stretching can be implemented as well as soft-tissue therapies such as Active Release Technique (ART) and Graston Technique.

If you are struggling with Hip Pain call my office today at (480) 366-4041.  We can Help!

Your friendly Chiropractor in Chandler AZ, Dr. Dan Rae, is back at the computer this morning to write about Hip Stress Fractures.  I do not see Hip Stress Fractures a lot in my practice, but I have dealt with them on occasion making it something that I feel I should address.

hip_stress_fracture

 

In the image above by MMG 2000, we are able to see the different types of Hip Stress Fractures that occur at the femoral neck.  Within the bone we have different types of cells one of which is an osteoclast and the other an osteoblast.  Osteoclasts in a sense eat bone or destroy it, and osteoblasts on the other hand create bone.  With repetitive stress to the femoral neck, microfractures occur.  This damage leads to increased bone remodeling, or the removal of old bone by osteoclasts and the formation of new bone by osteoblasts.  When osteoclastic activity surpasses osteoblastic activity, the bone becomes weakened leading to fracture.

In most cases that I have had in my office the patient is usually young and active, often participating in cross country, gymnastics, dancing, or marching band.  The pain comes on rather slowly and is worse when standing.  The pain is normal felt on the front and deep into the leg.

Treatment for the Tension/Transverse Stress Fracture is different from that of the Compression Stress Fracture.  With the Transverse Stress Fracture surgical pinning is required to stabilize the hip.  With the Compression Stress Fracture an elastic support is necessary as well as rest for 2 weeks.  After the two weeks non-weight-bearing exercises are implemented such as cycling and swimming.  The Displaced Fracture require surgical pinning as well.

If you are struggling with Hip Pain, call my office today (480) 366-4041.  We can Help!