Archives for posts with tag: sports

Your friendly Chiropractor in Chandler AZ, Dr. Dan Rae, is back at the computer this morning in preparations for Spring Training and the start of the Little League baseball season I thought it would be could to write about Little League Elbow, which is becoming more and more prevalent with the specialization in sport that kids are moving to these days.

little league elbow

In the image above by MK Carlton, we are able to see the possible injuries in young baseball players sustained from pitching all called Little League Elbow.  In all reality Little League Elbow is a syndrome.  The repetitive valgus (a valgus deformity is a term for outward angulation of the far end of a bone or joint) stress brought on by pitching causes a stretch injury to the inner portions of the elbow and a possible compression injury to the outer portions of the elbow as seen in the image above.  Pain at the inner aspect of the elbow is due to microtrauma to the medial anterior oblique ligament as well as causing accelerated growth and fragmentation of the medial epicondylar growth plate.  On the outer aspect of the elbow osteochondritis dissecans (Osteochondritis Dissecans of the elbow is a condition that causes pain in the elbow of children 8 to14 years of age. It most commonly involves the portion of the humerus called the capitellum, which helps to form the elbow joint and allows the forearm to rotate, turning the palm up or down.) of the capitellum with the possibility of injury to the head of the radius bone, including premature closure of the growth plate.

These patients usually come into my office as teenage baseball pitchers complaining of pain on either the inner or outer aspects of the elbow.

Two different routes can be taken depending on the severity of the injury.  If the x-rays show changes to the bones and growth plate an orthopedic consultation is necessary; however, if the x-rays are normal, rest from pitching needs to happen immediately.  Also, modifications to pitching mechanics must be made, specifically to how the curve ball is pitched.

If you are struggling with Elbow Pain, contact my office today (480) 366-4041.  We can Help!

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Your friendly Chiropractor in Chandler AZ, Dr. Dan Rae, is back at the computer this morning to write a little bit more about injuries to the elbow.  Today, I will be reviewing a condition called Posterior Impingement Syndrome.  We hear more about Shoulder Impingement Syndrome, but it can also occur in the elbow as well.

postimpingement

 

In the image above we have a clear picture of the elbow joint.  Posterior Impingement Syndrome is caused by the repetitive extension of the elbow that leads to compression on the back side of the elbow between the ulna, which is the bone on the bottom and the humerus, which is the bone on the top.  This may cause what is called a reactive synovitis (Synovitis is the inflammation of a synovial (joint-lining) membrane, usually painful, particularly on motion, and characterized by swelling, due to effusion (fluid collection) in a synovial sac.) or progress to degeneration and the production of osteophytes (bone spurs) or loose bodies as seen in the image above, which is seen by the top arrow.

These patients usually come into my office complaining of sharp pain on the back side of the elbow, especially on rapid extension of the elbow.  There may be associated complaints of popping or clicking with extension of the elbow or an occasional locking of the joint.

Management of this condition varies depending on if there are loose bodies or not.  If there are loose bodies, the individual will be referred to an orthopedic surgeon for surgical consultation.  In all other cases rest and ice is needed, and the patient is taped in a manner so as to not be able to fully extend the elbow.

If you are struggling with Elbow Pain, call my office today (480) 366-4041.  We can Help!

Your friendly Chiropractor in Chandler AZ, Dr. Dan Rae, is back at the computer this evening to talk about an injury that we do not hear about too often in Triceps Tendinitis.  It is also known as Posterior Tennis Elbow.  Triceps injuries have been getting a little more publicity over the past few weeks with the Baltimore Ravens star middle linebacker Ray Lewis having torn his, and star defensive tackle Justin Smith of the San Francisco 49ers injuring his triceps as well.

triceps tendinitis

In the image above by MMG 2000 we are able to clearly see the triceps tendon.  Irritation or strains of the triceps tendon are usually due to common athletic skills performed by boxers, weight lifters, pitchers, shot-putters, and some tennis players.

These patients typically come into my office complaining of pain at the tip of the elbow after performing an activity that required repetitive straightening of the elbow, or one single event that required forceful straightening of the elbow.

Treatment for Triceps Tendinitis is quite simple.  Myofascial release techniques such as Active Release Technique (ART) and Graston Technique are implemented to encourage healing and to prevent scar tissue formation.  Ice and rest from the activity that caused the pain is essential.  If the individual is working out the amount of weight utilized during elbow extensions needs to be reduced.

If you are struggling with Elbow Pain, call my office today (480) 366.4041.  We can Help!

Your friendly Chiropractor in Chandler AZ, Dr. Dan Rae, is back at the computer this morning to piggyback on the article I wrote the other day on Tennis Elbow and write one on Golfer’s Elbow today.  Golfer’s Elbow is also known as Medial Epicondylitis affecting the inner portions of the elbow differing from Tennis Elbow that affects the outer portions of the elbow.

GolfersElbow

Tennis Elbow is an injury that affects the muscles that extend the wrist, and those muscles originate from the bump on the outer portion of the elbow.  This bump is where the pain is felt with Tennis Elbow.  Golfer’s Elbow is an injury that affects the muscles that flex the wrist, and those muscles originate from the bump on the inner portion of the elbow.  And, as you may have guessed, this is where the pain is felt with Golfer’s Elbow.  Golfer’s Elbow is believed to be a tendinopathy (The term tendinopathy includes both inflammation and microtears, but many doctors may still use the term tendinitis to describe a tendon injury.) of those muscles that flex the wrist as well as the pronator teres muscle.

These patients come into my office complaining of pain on the inner portion of the elbow following activities that require a lot of repetition such as hammering or using a screwdriver.  In athletes, it usually occurs when flexing and pronation (rotating the hand towards the ground) such as in serving an overhead and forehand strokes.  Golfing or throwing may also cause symptoms.  These patients occasionally complain of pain or weakness when gripping.

Treatment for Golfer’s Elbow is no different than that of Tennis Elbow other than we would apply the Kinesiology Tape on the opposite side of the arm to relieve the tension being placed on the wrist flexor muscle group.  Myofascial release techniques such as Active Release Technique (ART) and Graston Technique have proven to be very beneficial with this injury, and they are utilized to prevent scar tissue formation and encourage healing.  Manipulation of the wrist and elbow have proven to be very effective as well.

If you are struggling with Golfer’s Elbow or any other sort of Elbow Pain, call my office today (480) 366-4041.  We can Help!

Your friendly Chiropractor in Chandler AZ, Dr. Dan Rae, is back at the computer during my lunch to write about a topic we have all heard about.  In fact, when we think of Elbow Pain, the first thing we think about is Tennis Elbow, also know as Lateral Epicondylitis.  Today, I will be explaining what Tennis Elbow is, how we get it, and how we go about treating it.

tenniselbow

There are many different theories out there as to what is the cause of Tennis Elbow; however, the theory that currently has the most backing right now is that initially there is a tearing of the extensor carpi radialis brevis at its origin.  There also may be some tearing in the extensor digitorum communis or the extensor carpi radialis longus.  All of these muscles have a primary responsibility of extending the wrist back, and a secondary responsibility of flexing or bending the elbow.  Repetitive movements that require forceful extension of the wrist, radial deviation (moving the wrist toward the thumb), and supination (holding the hand in a cupping position) are the most common causes.  Although it has been linked to tennis, other sports and occupational activities are also causes.  Meat cutters, plumbers, carpenters, and others  with similar jobs requirements are all affected.  With tennis, beginning players with poor backhand technique account for the majority of all cases.  With professional players, the forehand or serving are generally the cause.  The more frequent the individual plays, the higher risk they have of developing this injury.

In the acute cases, ice and rest from activities causing the discomfort.  Use of a splint on the wrist at 30-45 degrees of extension may be required to impose rest to relieve the tension on the extensor carpi radialis brevis.  This can also be done with Kinesiology Tape.  Myofascial release techniques such as Active Release Technique (ART) and Graston Technique are very effective to encourage healing and prevent scar tissue formation.  Mobilization of the wrist has proven to be very effective as well.

If you are struggling with Tennis Elbow or any other Elbow Pain, contact my office today (480) 366-4041.  We can Help!

Your friendly Chiropractor in Chandler AZ, Dr. Dan Rae, is back at the computer this afternoon to review a topic known as Little Leaguer’s Shoulder.  This is something that concerns me a lot because both of my older boys are playing baseball, and the oldest has just reached the level where the boys start pitching to each other.  Furthermore, I am certain that he will be doing some pitching.

little leaguer's shoulder

In the image above by RelayHealth, we can see the damage that is done with Little Leaguer’s Shoulder.  Rotational stresses on the growth plate of the humerus up near the shoulder results in a Salter-Harris Type 1 fracture in pitchers who over-pitch or pitch to frequently.  More rarely, this may cause a Salter-Harris Type 2 fracture.  The different types of Salter-Harris fractures can be seen in the image below.

Salter-Harris

These individuals come into my office complaining of shoulder pain that occurs mainly when throwing hard.  The pain began as a very minor pain, but over time it progresses to a substantial amount of pain.  They are able to point directly to the point of pain in the arm near the shoulder.

With this condition there is no agreed upon course of treatment; however, it is recommended that the arm be rested for a minimum of three months, and it made need up to a year.  Once it has healed, gradual return to throwing is needed with pain be a limiting factor.  Complications of Little Leaguer’s Shoulder include avascular necrosis, loose bodies, and early closure of the growth plate.

If you are struggling with Shoulder Pain, call my office today (480) 366-4041.  We can Help!